Coastwide
The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan, in which a six-reactor compound was struck by a tsunami, proved the vulnerability of reactors to flooding. Three of the units were destroyed. Nine US nuclear power plants are within about three kilometers of the ocean. Independent experts consider four of them, including two shown here—the Hope Creek Generating Station (the cooling tower billowing a cloud of steam) and Salem Nuclear Generating Station (the double domes on the right) in Lower Alloways Creek Township, New Jersey—especially vulnerable to sea level rise and storm surges. Fortunately, the risk of a tsunami, though not zero, is considered low on the US east coast. Image by Alex MacLean. United States, 2019.
Engineering

What the Seas Will Swallow

During his flights between Maine and Florida, MacLean noticed something he hadn’t given much thought to before: thousands of industrial sites and vast amounts of critical infrastructure perched perilously close to the water’s edge, not far above the current high water level.

Southeast
Floodwaters inundate Ashley Avenue in the heart of Charleston’s medical district in June 2018. The Medical University of South Carolina campus routinely floods, an issue the health system’s president said required “urgently needed funding” in a letter to Gov. Henry McMaster in February. File/Staff
Property

South Carolina keeps trying to build its way out of climate change — but it might be missing the point

Mid-Atlantic
Pratt environmental engineering professor Lee Ferguson discusses floodwater pollution in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. Photo Sergio Tovar

North Carolina: WHY FLORENCE IS STILL WITH US AND WHAT THAT MEANS FOR THE NEXT STORM

Gulf of Mexico
A map of the state's coastal master plan shows land loss (red) in Terrebonne, Lafourche, and surrounding parishes that scientists say will occur within 50 years if nothing is done to stop it. (Image: Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority).

Poll: Coastal restoration is a priority for state’ voters

Northeast
In May 2019, New York City announced the completion of a sand dredging project along the Rockaway Beach Boardwalk. But how long will it last? Mpi43/MediaPunch /IPX

New York: Rockaway Beach is Disappearing and Resurgent All at Once

Coastwide
File photo from 2015 of a house on Nags Head. In his new book, Orrin Pilkey, Duke professor emeritus of earth sciences, pinpoints how coastal landscapes and infrastructure are seeing the scars of climate change. DAVE DEWITT / WUNC

The Coming Floods: How Sea Level Rise Affects All Of Us