Science

Great Lakes
Science

This Summer’s Algal Bloom in Lake Erie Was Large, But Could Have Been Worse

This year’s algal bloom in western Lake Erie was about as bad as scientists expected. But it could have been worse.

Southeast
Science

Natural Georgia: Tracking diamondbacks on Jekyll Island

Last week, I joined Joseph Colbert and Mallory Harmel to learn more about the rattlesnakes of Jekyll Island.

Coastwide
Science

NOAA: Searching for Historic Deep-sea Mining Impacts on the Blake Plateau

From October 31 through November 21, 2019, NOAA and partners will conduct mapping and remotely operated vehicle operations from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to collect critical baseline information about unknown and poorly understood deepwater areas of the Southeastern U.S. continental margin.

Northeast
Science

Mass Special Commission on Ocean Acidification Holds First Meeting Friday

The first meeting of the Special Legislative Commission Relative to Ocean Acidification is set for Friday, November 8 in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The Commission was created by legislation passed by Senator Cyr and Representative Fernandes in 2018.

International
Science

Song of the Seagrass

Seagrass, the ocean’s early warning system, may well be our secret weapon in the fight against climate change.

International
Science

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways

Scientists say a failure of national management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals--many now banned in other countries such as the EU, USA and Canada--are damaging the nation's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef.

Coastwide
Science

Engineers invent smartphone device that detects harmful algae in 15 minutes

Portable, easy-to-use and low-cost technology could be used by fish farmers to monitor water quality quickly and conveniently. A team of engineers has developed a highly sensitive system that uses a smartphone to rapidly detect the presence of toxin-producing algae in water within 15 minutes.

Coastwide
Science

Expanding the horizons of environmental research

Supported by the Office of the Provost, the first Abess Scholars have wide latitude to bridge the gap between science and environmental policy.

Coastwide
Science

Training the Next Generation of Marine Biogeochemists

Early-career scientists came together recently to learn to use a suite of ocean biogeochemical sensors, with the goal of closing the knowledge gap between ocean technology and potential end users.

Coastwide
Science

How Do Submarine and Terrestrial Canyons Compare?

Insights from a new study could spark discoveries about Martian landscapes and also help researchers get to the bottom of canyon formation here on Earth.

International
Science

Past Antarctic ice melt reveals potential for 'extreme sea-level rise'

Sea levels rose as much as three metres per century during the last interglacial period as Antarctic ice sheets melted, a pace that could be exceeded in the future, given the turbo-charged potential of human-led climate change.

West Coast
Science

Scientists make discovery on coastal water flow

The 200-mile zone that hugs the curvature of the coast bursts with life, from phytoplankton to whales. Out in the open ocean, this activity is comparatively diminished. Understanding how coastal water is moved offshore fertilizing the open ocean is a long-standing goal of ocean scientists.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

New funding to study microplastic pollution effect on Delaware Bay blue crabs

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is often held up as the poster child for ocean pollution. And while the collection of trash collecting in the Pacific Ocean certainly deserves attention, researchers at the University of Delaware are concerned about a smaller source of pollution, much smaller.

Gulf of Mexico
Science

Tampa Bay awash in microplastic particles

They’re barely visible, only 1/8-inch or smaller, so it might not seem like a big deal. But it is. Microplastic particles are floating around in Tampa Bay in alarming numbers. In fact, research scientists from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and Eckerd College estimate that there may be as many as 4 billion of these indestructible particles at the bottom of the Bay.

International
Science

United Kingdom: Puffins make poor diet choices when the chips are down

A new study has shown that Britain's puffins may struggle to adapt to changes in their North Sea feeding grounds and researchers are calling for better use of marine protection areas (MPAs) to help protect the country's best known seabirds. Britain's coasts support globally important populations of many species of seabird, but they face many challenges as their established habitats change.

International
Science

The Pacific Ocean Blob Returns to Destroy Coral Near Hawaii, According to Satellite Technology

Satellite technology has been helping scientists track the Pacific Ocean Blob since its discovery in 2014. The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) monitoring satellite maps documented the return of this devastating surge of unnaturally warm water that is killing corals and other marine life.

Pacific Northwest
Science

Why are birds and seals starving in a Bering Sea full of fish?

Special report: After the Ice -- This is the second installment of a Seattle Times series exploring climate change in the northern Bering Sea region. The series is part of the Pulitzer Center’s Connected Coastlines reporting initiative. For more information, go to pulitzercenter.org/connected-coastlines

Coastwide
Science

Scripps Institute of Oceanography Awarded $5M to Study Toxic Algae Blooms

The blooms have the potential to kill marine mammals, but researchers don’t know why

International
Science

As well as being a mythic tale, Moby-Dick is a superb a guide to oceanography

Melville’s experience as a whaler equipped him with a deep knowledge of cetology and marine biology, making Moby-Dick a true novel of the sea

Southeast
Science

Point of View: The battle over water and public health returns to Tallahassee (with Podcast Interview)

The governor’s Blue-Green Algae Task Force has prepared initial recommendations for the Legislature in 2020, which will make it harder for lawmakers to evade their responsibility.

Gulf of Mexico
Science

Texas sees sharp drop in nesting sea turtles

The critically endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle had an offseason for nesting this year along Texas beaches, with 190 nests recorded in Texas.

Coastwide
Science

Largest mapping of breathing ocean floor key to understanding global carbon cycle

Marine sediments play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle due to the oxygen consumption and CO2 respiration of the organisms that live in and on the ocean floor. To help predict the changing contribution of this respiration to the carbon cycle in a warming world, researchers from the Royal Netherlands Institute of Sea Research (NIOZ) and universities in Taiwan have compiled the largest open-access database available of the sediment community oxygen consumption and CO2 respiration. Their findings are published in Nature Scientific Data.

International
Science

Casting light on iron enrichment in the ocean's twilight zone

Half of the marine life in the world's oceans depends on the enrichment of phytoplankton by dissolved iron, just as plants at the base of the food chain on land need nutrients to help them grow.

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

Deadly Algae Are Creeping Northward

In a warming ocean, Alexandrium algae are shredding marine food webs—and disrupting beloved Alaska traditions.

West Coast
Science

Purple sea urchins plague Oregon, California coasts

Tens of millions of voracious purple sea urchins that have already chomped their way through towering underwater kelp forests in California are spreading north to Oregon, sending the delicate marine ecosystem off the shore into such disarray that other critical species are starving to death.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

NC’s Next Sea Level Rise Study to Eye 2100

The next five-year update to the state’s 2010 sea level rise assessment report will look all the way out to 2100, the science advisory panel to the state Coastal Resources Commission decided during its Oct. 18 meeting.

Coastwide
Science

Study casts doubt on carbon capture

One proposed method for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere—and reducing the risk of climate change—is to capture carbon from the air or prevent it from getting there in the first place. However, research from Mark Z. Jacobson at Stanford University, published in Energy and Environmental Science, suggests that carbon capture technologies can cause more harm than good.

Coastwide
Science

New study reveals important yet unprotected global ocean areas

The largest synthesis of important marine areas conducted to date reveals that a large portion of Earth's oceans are considered important and are good candidates for protection. A first of its kind, the study was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of researchers including Ellen Pikitch, Ph.D., and Christine Santora of Stony Brook University and Dr. Natasha Gownaris, a Ph.D. graduate of Stony Brook University. The team examined 10 diverse and internationally recognized maps depicting global marine priority areas. The findings, published in Frontiers in Marine Science, may serve as a roadmap for the goal set by the United Nations to create 10 percent of the ocean as marine protected areas (MPAs) by 2020.

International
Science

Archaeologists uncover Essex dock 'where Charles Darwin's ship was dismantled'

Charles Darwin's ship was decommissioned in 1870, when it was thought to be have been dismantled by the person that bought it.

Coastwide
Science

Study: Rising seas threaten low-lying coastal cities, 10% of world population

The recent Typhoon Hagibis—the most powerful storm to hit Japan since 1958—caused massive destruction. The reported death toll as of October 22 has climbed to 80, with another 398 injured and 11 people still missing. Tens of thousands of homes were flooded, damaged, or without power after torrential rain and powerful winds resulted in tornadoes, widespread mudslides, and overflowing rivers. In addition, an earthquake in the northeastern area of Japan (Chiba-Tokyo) compounded landslides and flooding. Insured losses throughout the country are estimated at more than US$10 billion.

Coastwide
Science

Audio fingerprinting: The secrets of sand begin to emerge

Sand on beach may look all the same, but it's not. Researchers have found that the material has a "sound," one that can be linked to its home. Find the source, and we can learn more about how it moves around the world.

Gulf of Mexico
Science

Drug overdose treatment for humans can detox turtles poisoned by red tide, study shows

A detox therapy used to treat overdoses in humans may help save endangered sea turtles from red tide poisoning. (With American Shoreline Podcast).

International
Science

Drastic measures that can help save the world's coral reefs

Coral systems must adapt if they are to survive, and governments in countries with reefs can help them

International
Science

A new decade of UK ocean science

Executive Director, Prof Edward Hill, from the UK National Oceanography Centre talks to SciTech Europa Quarterly about the issues the ocean is facing.

International
Science

Asia’s coral faces a deadly onslaught

If overfishing and pollution don’t kill it, climate change will

West Coast
Science

Sea urchin explosion decimates kelp forests off Pacific coast CBC.ca

Seafloor denuded, fisheries for red abalone and red sea urchin destroyed

Coastwide
Science

Fish more tolerant than expected to low oxygen events

Fish may be more tolerant than previously thought to periods of low oxygen in the oceans, new research shows.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

Chesapeake Bay oyster restoration: Researchers hope bacteria can help

Ryan Hoover teaches sculpture making at the Maryland Institute College of Art. So, why is he developing a product that could help oysters grow in the Chesapeake Bay?

International
Science

VIDEO: Critically endangered shark spotted at UK gas field

Stunning footage has been captured of a critically endangered shark swimming at a gas field in the UK North Sea.

Gulf of Mexico
Science

Alabama beach mouse helped build the dunes that protect our coast

Alabamians love their beaches, but the relationship with tiny mammals that helped make the state’s coastal ecosystems has been somewhat more complicated.

Arctic & Antarctica
Science

Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted

Study finds even the tallest ice cliffs should support their own weight rather than collapsing catastrophically

Coastwide
Science

A Guide to Understanding Satellite Images of Hurricanes

[NOAA] On the morning of September 2, 2019, as a devastating Hurricane Dorian made landfall over three islands in the Bahamas, delivering torrential rain and sustained winds of 185 miles per hour, the VIIRS instruments on the NOAA-20 and NASA-NOAA Suomi-NPP (S-NPP) satellites captured infrared pictures from above. These images, caught at 2:13 am ET and 3:03 am ET respectively, showed a circular eye inside a nearly perfectly symmetrical Category-5 storm.

Coastwide
Science

Sea-Level Rise From Antarctic Ice Cliffs May Be Overestimated Because of Faulty Assumptions

Study finds even the tallest ice cliffs should support their own weight rather than collapsing catastrophically.

International
Science

Earth looks like a painting in stunning US Geological Survey satellite pics

In addition to their scientific value, many satellite images are simply intriguing to look at. Satellites capture an incredible variety of views of Earth. See the mesmerizing beauty of river deltas, mountains, and other sandy, salty, and icy landscapes. Some might even remind you of actual famous works of art!

Pacific Northwest
Science

After Menopause, Killer Whale Moms Become Pod Leaders (My wife asked me to post this)

As one of only a handful of animals on the planet to live many years after menopause, killer whales have just provided new insight into the benefits of this seemingly strange reproductive strategy. Females that are past their child-bearing years go on to become group leaders with valuable survival skills, scientists report today in the journal Current Biology.

West Coast
Science

Clingfish biology inspires better suction cup

A team of engineers and marine biologists built a better suction cup inspired by the mechanism that allows the clingfish to adhere to both smooth and rough surfaces. Researchers reverse engineered the clingfish's suction disk and developed devices that cling well to wet and dry objects both in an out of water. The devices can hold up to hundreds of times their own weight.