Science

Mid-Atlantic
Science

And now, land may be sinking

Study suggests mid-Atlantic is getting lower, which may exacerbate effects of sea-level rise

International
Science

Seeking the big picture of our planet? Check out satellite images on NOAA’s website

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has some of the world’s most advanced satellites. At any given moment, our planet is circled by NOAA satellites that transmit detailed information back to Earth, informing weather forecasts, climatological research – and you.

International
Science

The real 'Jaws': Great white shark's genetic secrets revealed

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The great white shark, one of the most fearsome predators in the world’s oceans in both fact and fiction, is a formidable creature — right down to its genes.

Coastwide
Science

New research suggests a different approach to protecting reef-building corals

Current fishing and pollution regulations don’t help corals cope with climate change, study says.

International
Science

Why the world needs wetlands

We’ve spent hundreds of years trying to protect ourselves from the Earth’s waters. So why, in the 21st century, are wetlands being restored and how can they help us cope with global warming? Since 1700, the world has lost 87 per cent of its wetlands according to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands in its 2018 Global Wetland Outlook (GWO).

Coastwide
Science

In the Eye of the Storm: Lessons Learned in the Wake of Hurricanes Florence, Michael, and Others

Hurricanes are nothing new in many coastal vacation rental markets. But as vacation rental managers and DMOs learn new lessons with each storm, the industry’s response in the aftermath evolves.

Gulf
Science

Was climate change a factor in Hurricane Michael’s strength? The answer is complicated

In 2016 John Ackerman and other climate experts predicted warmer waters and storm surge from climate change would lead to stronger storms, setting off negative consequences for Bay County and other low-lying areas. Those predictions arguably came true in the worst way with Hurricane Michael and other devastating hurricanes like Harvey and Irma, Ackerman and other experts say.

International
Science

Research forms complex picture of mercury pollution in a period of global change

Climate change and the loss of wetlands may contribute to increased levels of mercury concentrations in coastal fish, according to a Dartmouth College study.

International
Science

Get a glimpse of the ocean floor with remarkable images of deep sea creatures

The deep sea is a strange and scary place, being one of the last great unexplored habitats on our planet. But technology is developing that lets us glimpse the bottom of the ocean and even listen to its sounds.

International
Science

Experience the Life of the Deep Gulf of Mexico in 20 Videos

As we prepare for our 2019, Gulf of Mexico, Deep-Sea, Wood-Fall Collection, Research Cruise Spectacular from February 11th-24th, enjoy these videos from our 2017 expedition. Also follow us on Instagram and Twitter under hashtag #woodfall to keep updated on our upcoming cruise.

International
Science

Sea worms and jellyfish treat cancer and kill insects

Scientists point out the expediency of further research of marine invertebrates to isolate the antitumor compounds from them.

Coastwide
Science

Toward adaptive robotic sampling of phytoplankton in the coastal ocean

Abstract Currents, wind, bathymetry, and freshwater runoff are some of the factors that make coastal waters heterogeneous, patchy, and scientifically interesting—where it is challenging to resolve the spatiotemporal variation within the water column. We present methods and results from field experiments using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) with embedded algorithms that focus sampling on features in three dimensions.

Gulf
Science

Louisiana scientists hunt for elusive marsh bird before its habitat sinks under the sea

CAMERON PARISH – On a late-winter night, a small group of mosquito-bitten scientists and college students drag paint cans full of BBs and bolts through a remote marsh south of Lake Charles. With spotlights and fishing nets at the ready, they take high steps over tangles of long grass, hoping the clattering will flush out their quarry—a red-eyed, sparrow-sized bird that few people have ever seen.

International
Science

Pathogenic Bacteria Found On Microplastics Retrieved From Singapore's Beaches

Bacteria living on microplastic pollution in tropical marine environments include a number of pathogenic species as well as a few that might be helpful

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

A gigantic 50-foot sperm whale carcass keeps washing up on Hawaii's coast

No matter how hard they tried, authorities in Hawaii just couldn't get rid of a giant floating marshmallowy creature that kept washing up on their coastline. Fortunately, since the blob was being so stubborn, it provided scientists with some solid insights into marine life and the local environment.

International
Science

As ice melts, Greenland could become big sand exporter: study

OSLO (Reuters) - Greenland could start to export sand in a rare positive spinoff from global warming that is melting the island's vast ice sheet and washing large amounts of sediment into the sea, scientists said on Monday.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

As floods worsen, tide is shifting in climate-change debate

Inside and outside the walls of the state legislature, there’s been a noticeable shift in the conversation about climate change and its impact on North Carolina.

International
Science

Momentous mission: first successful invasive species removal in Marquesas

Conservationists leaped from boats onto sheer rock faces and braved “10,000 dive-bombing Sooty Terns” to achieve the first successful eradication of invasive rodents on Teuaua Island, French Polynesia. This success paves the way for larger island restorations across the Marquesas Archipelago.

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

Unusual Microbes From Deep-Sea Hold Clues to Early Life

A new study has revealed how a group of deep-sea microbes provides clues to the evolution of life on Earth, according to a recent paper in The ISME Journal. Researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) and others used cutting-edge molecular methods to study these microbes, which thrive in the hot, oxygen-free fluids that flow through Earth’s crust.

Coastwide
Science

Re-establishing oyster beds to maximize their ecological benefits

New GIS-based tool identifies best locations: Researchers have developed a mapping tool that identifies sites for re-establishing oyster reefs that maximize their ecological benefits -- such as water filtration. This Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based tool could inform restoration of other vital, sensitive coastal habitats.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

A Presidential Pardon for the Chesapeake Bay

Maj. Gen. Randy Taylor writes that Aberdeen Proving Ground takes its responsibility to the Chesapeake Bay seriously. "We recognize our streams and rivers do not stop at our boundaries, our more than 300 bald eagles are not restricted to our airspace ... "

Coastwide
Science

Is your dirty laundry making dirty mollusks? Traces of microplastics offer clues.

Researchers in Sitka have been looking at the impact of microplastics on local shellfish. Their findings illustrate a possible connection between microplastics in butter clams and household laundry.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

Virginia wants more action on climate change. Here's where residents stand on policies.

Throughout Virginia, most residents are worried about climate change, fear that it will harm people in the U.S. within a decade and want the government to do more to tackle the problem.

International
Science

Major study uncovers ‘sea change’ in world’s understanding of Atlantic conveyor belt

An international research programme has uncovered data that could transform scientists’ understanding of the Atlantic Ocean current – a circulation pattern that plays a central role in determining weather across the world. The warm water that the AMOC carries northwards releases heat into the atmosphere, which means it plays a crucial role in keeping western Europe warm.

International
Science

Cities, Accumulated Risk, and GIS

Around 600 cities in the world generate half of the world’s GDP and have a combined population of about 1.7 billion. Most of these 600 cities are either coastal cities or on the bank of the river which make them highly vulnerable for flooding.

Coastwide
Science

USGS 3DEP Lidar Point Cloud now available as Amazon Public Dataset

US: The USGS 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) announced the availability of a new way to access and process lidar point cloud data from the 3DEP repository.

International
Science

Position of Magnetic North Pole Officially Changed

NOAA has announced that the National Centers for Environmental Information has updated the World Magnetic Model mid-cycle to reflect unexpected changes in the location of the magnetic north pole.

International
Science

Our oceans broke heat records in 2018 and the consequences are catastrophic

Rising temperatures can be charted back to the late 1950s, and the last five years were the five hottest on record

Southeast
Science

Nearly all the seagrass in Biscayne Bay is dead. County commissioners want to know why

The past decade has not been good for Biscayne Bay: More than 25,000 acres of seagrass meadows have vanished as Miami boomed and climate change drove seas ever higher.

International
Science

Dreadful Discovery About Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish Has Silver Lining For Great Barrier Reef

Jonathan Allen has good news and bad news for Australians regarding the crown-of-thorns sea star.

West Coast
Science

What's killing sea stars? The beautiful creatures are dying at an alarming rate.

If you remember your high school biology lessons, you might recall that starfish aren’t really fish at all. Properly called sea stars, these spiny-skinned predators are an important part of ecosystems up and down North America’s west coast. In less than a decade, however, more than 20 species of sea stars—including the sunflower star, a keystone predator with a wide range—have been ravaged by a poorly-understood ailment known as sea star wasting disease.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

Experts, advocates assess state of ocean noise pollution

Any number of studies will tell you — it’s a noisy sea out there, and there’s at least a couple decades of work to do something about it. The impact of sea noise was the subject of discussion Saturday at the Ritz Theatre following a screening of the documentary “Sonic Sea” as part of the 2019 Green Screen Film Festival.

International
Science

Climate change will alter the color of the oceans, new research finds

Scientists find the ocean will look different in the future as a warming climate changes populations of marine microorganisms called phytoplankton.

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

Disappearing into the sea: Exploring permafrost coastal erosion in the Arctic

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The remote town of Barrow, Alaska, home to more than 4,000 people, touts picturesque views of the Arctic Ocean as well as an unparalleled connection to the Alaskan wild, but underneath its stunning beauty lies a major global crisis — permafrost coastal erosion — causing Barrow to gradually slip into the sea.

International
Science

The pervasiveness of microplastics - plastic particles are showing up in our food and in our bodies. Is that a problem?

About a year ago, Philipp Schwabl, a research scientist and physician specializing in intestinal diseases at the Medical University of Vienna, read an article about plastic pollution and started to connect the dots. "Nanoplastic in seafood could easily be eaten by humans; there is no reason to doubt this is happening." Richard C. Thompson, professor of marine biology, University of Plymouth

Coastwide
Science

Sonar Can Literally Scare Whales to Death, Study Finds

Naval sonar has been linked to mass strandings of otherwise-healthy whales for nearly two decades, but the precise mechanisms of how it affects whales has eluded scientists. Now, researchers have explained key details of how this disruptive signal triggers behavior in some whales that ends in death.

International
Science

Charcoal trade a threat to Myanmar’s vital mangrove forests

Vietnam, Thailand and Myanmar are home to the largest mangrove forests in SE Asia, but economic growth and illegal logging have damaged these forests, although better public awareness does offer hope

Gulf
Science

Texas Gulf wetlands face population, development challenges

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — To a motorist, zipping south through Galveston County from Houston to Galveston Island, the surrounding landscape might look like a whole lot of nothing — flat land, scrubby grass and frontage roads edging up to open prairie.

Coastwide
Science

Direct and indirect parental exposure to endocrine disruptors and elevated temperature influences fish gene expression

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Warmer water temperatures, combined with low-level exposure to chemicals already known to be harmful to aquatic life, influence the expression of genes in the offspring of an abundant North American fish species – and threaten organisms whose sex determination is sensitive to water temperature.

International
Science

Mixing it up in the web of life

Many types of marine plankton are either animal-like or plant-like. But a huge number are both, and they are upending ideas about ocean ecology.

International
Science

At many river deltas, scientists are missing a major source of sea level rise

For coastal communities, the sea level rise propelled by melting ice and warming oceans is bad enough. But people living on the soft, compressible sediments of river deltas have another factor to contend with: sinking land.

West Coast
Science

‘This is shocking.’ An undersea plague is obliterating a key ocean species

An “underwater zombie apocalypse.” That’s how wildlife veterinarian Joe Gaydos of the University of California (UC), Davis, describes “sea star wasting disease,” a blight that has decimated more than 20 species of sea stars from Mexico to Alaska since 2013.

West Coast
Science

Why Beaked Whales Return To Navy Sonar Range Despite Frequent Disturbance

Using data from underwater robots, scientists have discovered that beaked whales prefer to feed within parts of a Navy sonar test range off Southern California that have dense patches of deep-sea squid.

Coastwide
Science

Oceans Are Getting Louder, Posing Potential Threats to Marine Life

Christopher Clark, a senior researcher in the bioacoustics program at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, who has studied whale communication for 40 years, described the noise as a “living hell” for undersea life, which is exquisitely tuned to sound.

West Coast
Science

A biologist yearns to discover the secrets of Watts Towers’ shells

LOS ANGELES — Thirteen miles from the coast, marine biologist Bruno Pernet was himself surrounded by concrete, asphalt and an assortment of roughly 10,000 seashells. There were the iridescent shells of black abalone, the chalky shells of California Venus clams and the sun-bleached shells of Pismo clams.

International
Science

Ocean recoveries for tomorrow’s Earth: Hitting a moving target

As the human population has grown, our demands on the ocean have increased rapidly. These demands have similarly increased the pressure we place on these systems, and we now cause considerable damage globally. If we want to maintain healthy ocean ecosystems into the future, we must learn to use ocean resources in a sustainable way and facilitate recovery in regions that have declined.

International
Science

Weddell Sea Expedition Moves On to 'Endurance' Wreck Site

Having successfully completed the pioneering science programme at the Larsen C Ice Shelf, the Expedition enters its exploration phase with the aim of locating the wreck of Ernest Shackleton's lost ship 'Endurance'

Gulf
Science

Editorial: Extreme weather is now routine

Predicting the paths of hurricanes has improved in recent years. It is predicting their intensity that remains tough and problematic. That was one of the takeaways from a recent forum sponsored by the Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association — better known as SECOORA — held in Jacksonville.

Coastwide
Science

In Underwater Drones, a New Weapon for Hurricane Hunters

A researcher’s decision to put an underwater drone in Hurricane Irene’s path is helping to transform the science of hurricane intensity prediction.

Gulf
Science

Why people in the US south stay put in the face of climate change

From New Orleans to the Florida panhandle, many have built up psychological resilience after living through years of extreme weather

International
Science

New study demonstrates benefits of undervalued saltmarsh

A new tool which helps land managers assess the costs and benefits of re-introducing valuable saltmarsh, has been developed by economists and environmental scientists from the South West Partnership for Environmental and Economic Prosperity (SWEEP) at the University of Exeter.

International
Science

An improved method for estimating the probability of extreme events

Researchers at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have developed a new and more accurate method for estimating the probability of extreme events, such as storms, floods and earthquakes. The new method will be used in updating building codes and land-use regulations, and is applicable also in developing artificial intelligence, as well as in economics and medical data analysis.

Southeast
Science

Red tide, algae blooms: Reducing nutrients is best way to prevent pollution, say DEP, FWC

Limiting nutrient pollution into waterways is the best way to prevent toxic red tide and blue-green algae blooms, two state agencies told Florida lawmakers Wednesday. However, they didn't address the primary sources or suggest specific solutions, only said they're working on the issue with other state and federal agencies.

International
Science

How Plastic Cleanup Threatens the Ocean’s Living Islands

Home to vibrantly colored, tiny creatures, the ecosystems floating on the ocean’s surface remain all but unknown.

International
Science

Symbiosis in the Genes

Marine scientists join an international team to uncover the origins of symbiotic organs

West Coast
Science

What Are King Tides? - A Virtual Reality Explainer

You may have heard a lot of talk about king tides. But what are they exactly? Well in this Virtually Rick we’re going to take a dip into what they are and what they do.

International
Science

We need to rethink everything we know about global warming

New research shows that the degree to which aerosols cool the earth has been grossly underestimated, necessitating a recalculation of climate change models to more accurately predict the pace of global warming.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

Cold stuns turtles off NC beaches. Volunteers work to find them before it’s too late

When the water temperature drops below 50 degrees off North Carolina’s Outer Banks, volunteers on the barrier islands go on alert, the Ocracoke Observer reports.

Gulf
Science

Florida red tide episode kills record number of sea turtles

A Florida red tide outbreak close to 16 months old has killed more sea turtles than any previous single red tide event on record, and manatee deaths are not far behind.

Gulf
Science

Hurricane Katrina, explained

Hurricane Katrina was the costliest storm in U.S. history, and its effects are still felt today in New Orleans and coastal Louisiana.

International
Science

Scientists find new evidence of life beneath Antarctic ice

A research team drilling thousands of feet under the Antarctic Ice Sheet has found new evidence of microbial life there — life forms not known to exist elsewhere.

International
Science

Oceans had their hottest year on record in 2018 as global warming accelerates

Earth’s oceans had their warmest year on record in 2018, a stark indication of the enormous amount of heat being absorbed by the sea as greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, scientists reported Wednesday.

Coastwide
Science

Unraveling threads of bizarre hagfish's explosive slime

Biologists have modeled the hagfish's gag-inducing defense mechanism mathematically.

Southeast
Science

New conservation practice could reduce nitrogen pollution in agricultural drainage water

URBANA, Ill. - Every summer, a "dead zone" forms in the Gulf of Mexico. Plumes of oxygen-robbing algae, fed by excess nitrogen coming in from the Mississippi River, kill off marine life and threaten the livelihoods of those who fish the Gulf.

International
Science

SharkoFiles: Dwarf Lantern Shark

The dwarf lantern shark is among the smallest species of fish in the world. The name of the shark comes from the fact that they are a small (dwarf) shark and are bioluminescent (lantern) in the dark environment of the deep sea level (Benthic zone) where they dwell. The Dwarf lantern shark was recently discovered in 1964.

International
Science

Antarctica losing six times more ice mass annually now than 40 years ago

Antarctica experienced a sixfold increase in yearly ice mass loss between 1979 and 2017, according to a study published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Southeast
Science

EDITORIAL: DeSantis (Quietly) Acknowledges Threat Sea-Level Rise Poses to Florida

This is whole new tone for a governor's office that told Floridians, basically, that we couldn't afford to both create jobs and protect the environment.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

Report: Nation's biggest estuary hit hard by pollution

In this Aug. 1, 2018, file photo, debris washed into the Chesapeake Bay from record rainfall accumulates around a sailboat in Annapolis, Md. An annual report on the Chesapeake Bay says pollution from unusually heavy rains in 2018 contributed to the first decline in a decade in the overall health of the nation's largest estuary.

International
Science

Responses of benthic foraminifera to changes of temperature and salinity

Benthic foraminifera are widely used as paleoenvironmental proxies because of their high sensitivity to environmental changes and excellent preservation potential in sediment. Affected by global changes, environmental factors such as seawater temperature and salinity are changing, which will affect the distribution and species composition of benthic foraminifera. A recent study revealed how the benthic foraminiferal community respond to the change of temperature and salinity.

International
Science

Moonlight influences opening and closing of oysters' shells

A new study suggests the mollusks may widen and narrow their shells depending on movement of plankton, which shifts with the lunar cycle

International
Science

Scientists Discover The Remains of a Whale Inside a Bigger, Ancient Whale

We usually think of whales as serene, gentle creatures, but a new study on an ancient species paints a different picture. Around 35 million years ago, in the late Eocene, a giant whale roamed the oceans, feasting on large fish and, the new evidence suggests, other smaller whales. Yikes.

Northeast
Science

Delaware gets $19 million for water research

As the country’s lowest-lying state, Delaware is especially vulnerable to rising sea levels — and the influence of saltwater on the wildlife that depends on freshwater wetlands. What’s more, water quality throughout the state is poor.

International
Science

As Disease Ravages Coral Reefs, Scientists Scramble for Solutions

As oceans warm, coral reefs are suffering not only from bleaching but from deadly outbreaks of disease. Researchers are developing remedies, but the key question is whether these solutions can work on a large-enough scale to save vast reef systems from Florida to Australia.

International
Science

Oceans warming faster than expected, set heat record in 2018: scientists

OSLO (Reuters) - The oceans are warming faster than previously estimated, setting a new temperature record in 2018 in a trend that is damaging marine life, scientists said on Thursday.

Coastwide
Science

Extreme Weather’s Link to Climate Change Is Becoming Clearer

“The science is advancing fast, and that may surprise a lot of people.”

Coastwide
Science

All Sand on Earth Could Be Made of Star Stuff

Silica, a common ingredient in sand, concrete and glass, may have its origins in supernovae

International
Science

The Last Four Years Have Been Earth's Warmest on Record

Earth had its fourth-warmest year on record in 2018, capping off a run of four years in row where global temperatures were the highest on record, according to Europe's Copernicus Climate Change Service.

International
Science

Galápagos island gets its first iguanas since Darwin after mass-release

A group of more than 1,400 iguanas have been reintroduced to an island in the Galápagos archipelago nearly two centuries after they disappeared from there, authorities said on Monday.

International
Science

The long memory of the Pacific Ocean - Historical cooling periods are still playing out in the deep Pacific

Cold waters that sank in polar regions hundreds of years ago during the Little Ice Age are still impacting deep Pacific Ocean temperature trends. While the deep Pacific temperature trends are small, they represent a large amount of energy in the Earth system.

International
Science

Antarctica's icy frontier

In January 2019, a Dutch marine charity, the Flotilla Foundation, is due to send a major international expedition to Antarctica with the aim of exploring the remote, harsh and little studied Weddell Sea, one of the most pristine marine ecosystems in the world.

Coastwide
Science

Tackling greenhouse gases

Faculty in the Department of Mechanical Engineering are developing technologies that store, capture, convert, and minimize greenhouse gas emissions.

Coastwide
Science

U.S. government shutdown starts to take a bite out of science

Rattlesnakes, bears, hurricanes, and freezing weather haven’t stopped ecologist Jeff Atkins from taking weekly hikes into Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park for the past 8 years to collect water samples from remote streams. But Atkins is now facing an insurmountable obstacle: the partial shutdown of the U.S. government, in its third week.

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

Uncovering the secret lives of salmon

An international team of scientists is heading to the Gulf of Alaska for a ground-breaking research survey to uncover the secret lives of Pacific salmon in the winter.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

Endangered whale strands itself on Masonboro Island

MASONBORO ISLAND, NC (WECT) - A team with the UNCW Marine Mammal Stranding Program were called to Masonboro Island Sunday after reports of a stranded whale. Upon arrival, the team encountered a young Sei Whale, which is a type of Baleen Whale. The young, very thin whale should've been with its mother and hadn't eaten for a while. The marine biology professor says a plastic garbage bag was found in the animal's mouth during a necropsy.

Gulf
Science

Survey finds Texas' Gulf of Mexico shoreline has most trash

Dec. 31 (UPI) -- A new survey shows 10 times more trash ends up on the shores of Texas than any other state along the Gulf of Mexico.

Northwest
Science

Killer whale watch: Future of declining southern residents at risk

The number of southern residents is now 74 in three pods, whose population has fluctuated from 70 to 99 individuals since 1976.

Gulf
Science

Manatee deaths soar in Florida, but drop Volusia, Flagler

Widespread red tide algae blooms proved devastating for Florida’s manatees in 2018, helping boost the total number of manatee deaths statewide to the second highest on record.

Gulf
Science

Marine debris study counts trash from Texas to Florida

Trash, particularly plastic, in the ocean and along the shoreline is an economic, environmental, human health, and aesthetic problem causing serious challenges to coastal communities around the world, including the Gulf of Mexico.

International
Science

Rising sea forces villagers to abandon rice farming

As the sea level rises due to climate change and the land turns more saline, farmers in Tamil Nadu on India’s Bay of Bengal coast are forced to give up rice cultivation

International
Science

Sunken 17th-Century 'Pirate Ship' Discovered, Alongside Gunpowder-Packed Grenades

Ancient hand grenades and cannons from the wreck of a former pirate ship have been found along the coast of Cornwall in the U.K.

International
Science

The number of single male Magellanic penguins is rising at this breeding colony. Here’s why.

Like most of their stout-bodied, flippered kin, Magellanic penguins spend much of their lives in the ocean. From late autumn through winter and into spring in the Southern Hemisphere, these South American penguins swim off the coast of southern Brazil, Uruguay and northern Argentina in search of anchovies, sardines and squid.

Southeast
Science

Huge previously-undetected coral reef off US East Coast

Earlier this year, scientists were surprised to discover a huge forest of coldwater corals off the coast of South Carolina. A scientist aboard the expedition discusses the find.

Caribbean
Science

Sea grasses offer affordable beach protection services

Conservationists hope the research inspires governments to do more to protect sea grass beds and related habitats. Jan. 2 (UPI) -- New research suggests sea grasses can protect beaches at a discount. Beaches are beautiful. They're also a valuable commodity for many places, including the Caribbean, where island economies rely on tourist dollars. It makes sense to spend money to ensure the beaches don't go anywhere.

Caribbean
Science

Submersible Is First to Reach Bottom of Atlantic Ocean

U.S. equity-firm founder piloted the craft to the bottom of the Puerto Rico Trench, in a bid to reach the deepest spot in each of the world’s oceans

International
Science

Climate change is turning turtles female, claim scientists

Up to 93% of green turtle hatchlings could be female by 2100 – as climate change causes “feminisation” of the species, new research suggests.

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

‘Extreme’ lack of sea ice and autumn heat marked Alaska weather in 2018

A stunning shortage of Bering Sea ice in spring and record warmth in autumn marked what scientists say will be one of the warmest years recorded in Alaska, raising questions about everything from the future of commercial fishing to new agricultural opportunities.

Coastwide
Science

The Next Climate Frontier: Predicting a Complex Domino Effect

Motivated by events like Hurricane Harvey, researchers are trying to determine how climate change interacts with agriculture, energy, transportation and other human systems

International
Science

Māui’s dolphin: going, going, gone?

Clean, green New Zealand. With a dirty little secret. We are on track to becoming the first country in the world to cause the extinction of a marine dolphin. The smallest in the world - the Māui Dolphin.

Coastwide
Science

5 Reasons To Feel Hopeful About The Oceans In 2019

Over the course of 2018, we have seen how human impacts and global climate change are rapidly altering the world's oceans.

Southeast
Science

The Disease Threatening Coral Reefs In Martin County

Just off our shores, not much more than a good swim from the sand, you could, until recently, find the most majestic of creatures, on land or at sea. Scientists named it orbicella faveolata. But a dive boat captain would tell you to look for the mountainous star coral, a name befitting its stature.