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Science

International
Science

World - Capturing the Intricacy of Breaking Waves sing Artificial Intelligence

When waves reach a certain height, they break, cresting and breaking into a shower of droplets and bubbles. These waves can range in size from a surfer’s point break to a soft ripple coming to shore. For decades, the intricacies of how and when a wave breaks have been too complicated to anticipate.

International
Science

World - This is how NASA measures rising sea levels from space

Climate change is an imminent threat to humanity’s future, but the global climate is so complex that it’s often hard to even see the scale of the problem. One of the best ways we have to measure climate change might not be what you expect – because it’s not about measuring the land or the atmosphere. Instead, to learn about climate change, we need to measure the ocean.

International
Science

World - Corals and sea anemones turn sunscreen into toxins – understanding how could help save coral reefs

Researchers have long suspected that an ingredient in sunscreen called oxybenzone was harming corals, but no one knew how. A new study shows how corals turn oxybenzone into a sunlight-activated toxin.

Coastwide
Science

CA - Stanford gets $1B for climate change school from John Doerr

Stanford University will launch a new school focusing on climate change thanks to a $1.1 billion gift from billionaire venture capitalist John Doerr and his wife, Ann, the university announced Tuesday.

International
Science

World - New Research Resurrects 'Lost' Coral Species

With about one-third of the world’s corals currently under threat of extinction due to climate change, Curtin researchers have made the encouraging discovery of a ‘lost’ species of coral that had been hidden for more than 50 years.

Great Lakes
Science

OH - More than 50 years after Cleveland's river burned, farmers address quality issues| Opinion

Fred Yoder found that applying nitrogen-infused fertilizer to his fields three times in a growing season instead of all at once helped his crops use the nutrient more efficiently, and less nitrogen ended up in rivers and streams.

International
Science

World - Unmixing deep sea sedimentary records identifies sensitivity of marine calcifying zooplankton to abrupt warming and ocean acidification in the past

Ocean acidification and rising temperatures have led to concerns about how calcifying organisms foundational to marine ecosystems, will be affected in the near future.

West Coast
Science

CA - Revolutionary Comprehensive Regional Diagnostic of Microbial Ocean Life Using DNA Testing

Large-scale ‘metabarcoding’ methods could revolutionize how society understands forces that drive seafood supply and the planet’s ability to remove greenhouse gases.

International
Science

Tunisia - 'Lungs of the Mediterranean' at risk

MONASTIR, Tunisia - Under the Mediterranean waters off Tunisia, gently waving green seagrass meadows provide vital marine habitats for the fishing fleets and an erosion buffer for the beaches the tourism industry depends on.

Coastwide
Science

USA - Let's bury our CO2. What could possibly go wrong?

We did not act early enough on climate change, and we continue to burn through our carbon budget too fast. As a result, we are faced with the need to capture and store away increasingly large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2).

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

AK - Expanding beaver pond distribution in Arctic Alaska, 1949 to 2019

Abstract - Beavers were not previously recognized as an Arctic species, and their engineering in the tundra is considered negligible. Recent findings suggest that beavers have moved into Arctic tundra regions and are controlling surface water dynamics, which strongly influence permafrost and landscape stability.

Coastwide
Science

World - Sea Levels Are Creeping Up, But Some Beaches Are Getting Bigger. Here's Why

In a warmer world, rising sea levels could render many coastlines, beaches, and reef islands uninhabitable, or destroy them altogether. The 1.09℃ Earth has warmed since pre-industrial times has already heightened seas by 20 centimeters.

Southeast
Science

NC - In a warming world, 'Cat 6' hurricanes could soon be coming to a coast near you

A few days before Hurricane Dorian slammed into Ocracoke Island and the southern Outer Banks in September 2019, the massive storm was packing winds of 185 mph as it devastated the Bahamas.

Coastwide
Science

World - Dumping treated nuclear wastewater in Pacific Ocean not recommended | University of Hawaiʻi System News

Japan has proposed discharging treated nuclear wastewater into the Pacific Ocean, and an independent panel of global experts on nuclear issues was developed to support Pacific nations in their consultations. Robert Richmond, a research professor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) and director of the Kewalo Marine Laboratory, was one of five experts selected to join the panel.

International
Science

UK - Scientists find new plastic-loving bacteria able to cross oceans - Sentinelassam

UK scientists have found new types of plastic-loving bacteria that stick to plastic in the deep sea that may enable them to "hitchhike" across the ocean.

Coastwide
Science

World - NOAA report: 2021 set records for greenhouse gases

A new report shows that methane, the second-most potent greenhouse gas, set records in 2021.

Coastwide
Science

World - Sweet spots in the sea: Mountains of sugar under seagrass meadows

Seagrasses play an important role in the climate. They are one of the most efficient sinks of carbon dioxide on Earth. A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology now reports that seagrasses release large amounts of sugar, largely in the form of sucrose, into their soils—worldwide more than 1 million tons of sucrose, enough for 32 billion cans of coke.

International
Science

World - Disease-causing parasites can hitch a ride on plastics and potentially spread through the sea, new research suggests

Microplastics are a pathway for pathogens on land to reach the ocean, with likely consequences for human and wildlife health, according to a new study. This study connects microplastic pollution in the ocean with land-based, diseases-carrying pathogens. The study, published April 26 in the journal Scientific Reports, is the first to connect microplastics in the ocean with land-based pathogens

Gulf of Mexico
Science

TX - Creepy dolls keep washing up on this stretch on Texas coastline. ‘A lot of nightmares

The dolls keep arriving, month after month, year after year. Where they come from is a mystery, but the waves bring them in and lay them on the Texas sand, where Mission-Aransas Reserve researchers find them. Were they lost or were they discarded? How long ago?

Coastwide
Science

World - The relationship between ecosystem services and human modification displays decoupling across global delta systems

Abstract -- The ties between a society and its local ecosystem can decouple as societies develop and replace ecosystem services such as food or water regulation via trade and technology. River deltas have developed into important, yet threatened, urban, agricultural and industrial centres.

West Coast
Science

CA - A red tide off the coast of Orange County and the South Bay was raising concerns among wildlife experts, as the murky waters, caused by blooming algae that pose a risk for seabirds.

A red tide off the coast of Orange County and the South Bay was raising concerns among wildlife experts, as the murky waters, caused by blooming algae that pose a risk for seabirds.

West Coast
Science

CA - Tracking the space-time evolution of ocean acidification extremes in the California Current System and Northeast Pacific

Abstract Ocean acidification is punctuated by episodic extremes of low pH and saturation state with regard to aragonite (ΩA). Here, we use a hindcast simulation from 1984 to 2019 with a high-resolution regional ocean model (ROMS-BEC) to identify and track ocean acidification extremes (OAX) in the Northeast Pacific and the California Current System (CCS).

International
Science

World - Night lights make even the seas bright

Not even the sea is safe from the glare of humans’ light at night. Researchers published the first global atlas of ocean light pollution. It shows large chunks of the sea lit up at night. And that risks confusing or disrupting the behaviors of sea life.

Gulf of Mexico
Science

FL - New study links red tides and dead zones off west coast of Florida

Red tides are becoming a near annual occurrence off the west coast of Florida, which are caused by massive blooms of the algae Karenia brevis fueled in part by excess nutrients in the ocean.