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Science

Arctic & Antarctica
Science

Arctic - Arctic Ocean's 'last ice area' may not survive the century

With warming climate, summer sea ice in the Arctic has been shrinking fast, and now consistently spans less than half the area it did in the early 1980s. This raises the question: It this keeps up, in the future will year-round sea ice—and the creatures who need it to survive—persist anywhere?

Great Lakes
Science

MI - Federal funding extends Great Lakes climate adaptation research and engagement at U-M and MSU

Researchers at the University of Michigan and Michigan State University have been awarded $5.4 million from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to continue their study of climate change and variability risks in the larger Great Lakes region for the next five years.

International
Science

World - Our underwater future: What sea level rise will look like around the globe

The planet is warming rapidly, resulting in historic drought, deadly floods and unusual melting events in the Arctic. It is also causing steady sea level rise, which scientists say will continue for decades.

Northeast
Science

MA - A new $905,988 yellow buoy will soon be in Buzzards Bay. Here's what it will do

A new high-tech buoy that measures wave height and direction, and provides mariners with real-time weather information intended to improve navigational safety, will be installed soon in Buzzards Bay.

Coastwide
Science

World - Yale Researchers Say Atmospheric Rivers Are Stable For Now — But Change Is On The Way

Yale researchers are charting the course of mighty “rivers” in the sky that are holding steady in the face of climate change — for now.

Pacific Northwest
Science

OR - Oceanic dead zones are worse than ever

The Oregon coast is known for its stunning beauty. But under the surface, these cold ocean currents support one of the most productive ecosystems on the planet — and because of that, one of the largest fishing fleets on the west coast.

Northeast
Science

NY - A summer of discontent in Long Island's coastal waters

Scientists at Stony Brook University have completed their assessment of water quality in Long Island's estuaries in 2021 and the news is not good. During the months of June through October, every major bay and estuary across Long Island was afflicted by toxic algae blooms and oxygen-starved, dead zones.

International
Science

World - Crabs Are Spellbound By Electromagnetic Fields Emitted By Underwater Power Cables

Underwater power cables may be having a mesmerizing effect on brown crabs, causing them to lethargically linger around the seafloor longer than they should, a new study has found. Most concerningly, electromagnetic fields emitted by the cables appear to lead to cellular changes in the edible crabs, potentially making them more vulnerable to infections and affecting their migration habits.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

NC - Stinging fish invasion along East Coast may have begun off North Carolina, USGS says

North Carolina may owe Florida an apology. The lionfish invasion plaguing waters off Florida may have begun in North Carolina, according to a new study from the U.S. Geological Survey.

Northeast
Science

MD - University of Maryland Eastern Shore Receives $30M NOAA Grant to Diversify Marine Sciences Workforce

PRINCESS ANNE, Md.- NOAA has announced that it will continue its two-decade commitment to support the next generation of marine scientists and researchers at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.

Arctic & Antarctica
Science

Arctic - Sea-level rise causing frozen grounds along Arctic coastlines to thaw, study suggests

The Arctic sea ice has suffered devastating loss and has shrunk to its second lowest on record. Melting sea ice is just one of many signs of a warming climate in the North. Emanuela Campanella explains how climate change is rapidly transforming the Arctic Circle. – Sep 22, 2020

International
Science

UK - Algae blooms investigated as potential mass seabird deaths cause

Blooms of toxic algae in the North Sea are being investigated as one potential cause behind the “dreadful” death of thousands of seabirds along the east coast.

Pacific Northwest
Science

OR - Oceanic dead zones are worse than ever

The Oregon coast is known for its stunning beauty. But under the surface, these cold ocean currents support one of the most productive ecosystems on the planet — and because of that, one of the largest fishing fleets on the west coast.

International
Science

World - The Lurking Danger of Ocean Acidification

In 2010, the world’s attention was captured when Deep Water Horizon, the world’s largest marine oil spill, began spewing into the Gulf of Mexico. While this crisis was ongoing, there had been a silent, arguably even deadlier, environmental concern severely affecting the Gulf’s coastal ecosystems: ocean acidification.

International
Science

World - A group of little-known killer whales have been identified as big hunters of the sea

(CNN). Swimming deep in the Pacific Ocean, a group of little-known killer whales that eat large sea mammals including grey whale calves has been found, researchers say.

International
Science

Mediterranean - Mediterranean 'drowning' In 3,760 Tonnes Of Plastics Claims Greek Scientific Study

The Mediterranean is ‘drowning’ with about 3,760 metric tonnes of plastic from its shores and surface to its bottom, according to a new Greek scientific study.

International
Science

World - How will climate change affect the bigger fishes in the sea?

Tunas, sharks, billfishes and swordfish are wide-ranging species that can respond rapidly to environmental changes. Many within this group are top predators and can move across ocean basins and between shallow and deep waters in response to oceanic conditions.

Mid-Atlantic
Science

NJ - New Jersey’s tidal marshes in danger of disappearing, study shows

New Jersey’s tidal marshes aren’t keeping up with sea level rise and may disappear completely by the next century, according to a study led by Rutgers researchers.

Hawaii & Alaska
Science

AK - Growing potential for toxic algal blooms in the Alaskan Arctic: A warming Arctic presents potential new threats to humans and marine wildlife in the fast-changing region

Changes in the northern Alaskan Arctic ocean environment have reached a point at which a previously rare phenomenon -- widespread blooms of toxic algae -- could become more commonplace, potentially threatening a wide range of marine wildlife and the people who rely on local marine resources for food. That is the conclusion of a new study about harmful algal blooms (HABs) of the toxic algae Alexandrium catenella.

West Coast
Science

CA - How warming West Coast waters changed the marine ecosystem

The shifts in temperature and species can provide lessons for how fluctuating temperatures might change ecosystems.

Coastwide
Science

How fussy eating and changing environments led to the diversity of sharks today (and spelled the end for megalodon)

Before humans and early primates, before dinosaurs, and even before trees, there were sharks. Sharks have been around for more than 400 million years (although how long exactly remains contested).

International
Science

Mexico - Bizarre mangrove forest far from the coast offers clues to sea level rise

The 100,000-year-old forest shows that seas have been dozens of feet higher than today, a warning of how much they could rise with climate change.