Coastwide
via First Street Foundation

USA - Schumer Insists on Keeping Beachfront Bailouts for Wealthy Americans' Vacation Homes

The senate majority leader is stymying long-needed increases in federal flood insurance rates.

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is $20.5 billion in the hole, even after Congress canceled $16 billion in debt in 2017. This financial shortfall is largely because the program does not charge nearly enough in premiums to pay for the flood damage on the properties it insures. For decades, taxpayer bailouts of the NFIP have enabled people to live and build in flood-prone areas instead of bearing the risks themselves.

In order to address this problem, the NFIP has been working on its new Risk Rating 2.0 initiative, with the aim of charging premiums that more accurately reflect the unique flooding risks of individual properties. The agency had planned to release its updated rates later this year.

Not so fast, says Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D–N.Y.). The senator's office recently informed FEMA that adjusted premiums could have a "severe impact" on homeowners, and urged Congress and the Biden administration to work together toward "affordable protection" for flood-prone communities. Schumer raised a similar alarm shortly after the changes were first announced: "How can we ram through a national flood insurance plan that could unfairly put a bull's-eye on the backs of Long Island and New York homeowners without more consultation?" he asked at an April 2019 press conference. "Halt. Stop. Stop this plan."

Actually, lots of beachfront dwellers in New York (and elsewhere) have been "unfairly" taking advantage of taxpayers. A recent study by the nonprofit research group First Street Foundation calculates that the average estimated annual loss for each of the 4.3 million properties most at risk of flooding is $4,419, whereas NFIP premiums average $981. In other words, their flood insurance premiums would have to increase 4.5 times over their current rates to fairly cover the flooding risks to these properties.

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