USA - NOAA announces $4.6 million in coastal and infrastructure resilience grants

NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) is awarding more than $4.6 million in fiscal year 2021 to fund research that will inform communities on how to best address sea level rise affecting coastal ecosystems, communities, infrastructure, and surface transportation.

NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) is awarding more than $4.6 million in fiscal year 2021 to fund research that will inform communities on how to best address sea level rise affecting coastal ecosystems, communities, infrastructure, and surface transportation. The projects will also investigate the effectiveness of natural features or restored coastal habitats to enhance coastal resilience.

Funding under NOAA’s Effects of Sea Level Rise Program will support five new and eight continuing research projects in 21 states. NOAA is partnering with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to co-fund two of the new projects.

The complex challenges of sea level rise, coastal flooding, and increased storm frequency pose increasing risks to our nation’s communities and their surrounding ecosystems. Storm surge and coastal flooding that alters shorelines also represent a significant threat to ports, roads, public transportation and rail.

A full list of new grant awards and a summary of each is available online. These awards focus on assessing the performance of conventional engineering approaches versus nature-based approaches to mitigate the effects of sea level rise and flooding on coastal ecosystems and communities. By combining field research with models and tools that can predict vulnerability and resilience, the projects will identify the most effective actions and land management decisions that consider both human and ecological needs.

“Our Effects of Sea Level Rise program supports science that will inform management decisions to reduce the risks of flooding and sea level rise to coastal communities, and determine the effectiveness of a range of different management actions that are being considered for improving coastal resilience,” said Steve Thur, director of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. “This is accomplished by enabling diverse science teams to work directly with partners that make decisions on how to protect our coasts from flooding.”

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