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US - FEMA facing disaster overload and hurricane season hasn't started yet

NOAA’s outlook calls for a 60% chance of an above-average season with 13 to 20 named storms. The average for a season is 14 named storms.

The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is forecasting its seventh-consecutive “above average” hurricane season with up to 20 named storms battering the Atlantic between June 1 and Nov. 1.

Florida has been fortunate without a hurricane crashing ashore since Hurricane Michael in October 2018, dodging all of last year’s 30 named storms that made 2020 the most active Atlantic hurricane season on record.

This year’s forecast, while still “above average,” calls for a milder mean season than those of recent vintage in the Atlantic.

“Although NOAA scientists don’t expect this season to be as busy as last year, it only takes one storm to devastate a community,” Acting NOAA Administrator Ben Friedman said Thursday when the agency announced its forecast.

NOAA’s outlook calls for a 60% chance of an above-average season with 13 to 20 named storms. The average for a season is 14 named storms.

Six-to-10 of those named storms will develop into hurricanes with winds of 74 mph or higher, NOAA estimates, with three-to-five spawning into major hurricanes with winds topping 111 mph.

NOAA’s outlook jibes with other forecasts. Colorado State University Department of Atmospheric Science’s April outlook predicts 17 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes, and The Weather Company, which operates the Weather Channel, predicts 19 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes.

Read also: Hurricane season outlook: As NOAA predicts ‘above-normal’ season, Biden doubles emergency spending  Boston Herald

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