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Scientists have said British holidaymakers must stop having sex with strangers on Gran Canaria's famous sand dunes (pictured, file photo)

UK - British holidaymakers must STOP having sex with strangers on Gran Canaria's sand dunes because they are harming rare plants and bushes, scientists say

Researchers found people traveling to have illicit sex on the dunes is having a negative impact on the ecology of the 1,000-acre area on the Canary Island. Study found 300 favorite locations of 'cruisers' on the south of the island . The sand dunes have been a protected nature reserve in Spain since 1987. They are even considered one of the greatest natural treasures in the country

Scientists have said British holidaymakers must stop having sex with strangers on Gran Canaria's famous sand dunes.

Research found that so many people are travelling to the Canary Island to have open-air illicit sex on the dunes that rare plants and bushes are being destroyed.

The study discovered nearly 300 favourite locations on the vast area of sand located on the south side of the island.

Covering around 1,000 acres of the island found off the coast of Africa, the dunes have been protected as a nature reserve since 1987 and are considered one of the greatest natural treasures in Spain.

And they have concluded that the activities carried out have a direct impact on the dunes and on eight native plant species, three of which are endemic.

The study was carried out by the Group of Physical Geography and Environment, the Institute of Oceanography and Global Change (IOCAG-ULPGC) and the Beach and Dune Systems (BEADS) Laboratory of Flinders University.

Their conclusions have now been published in a report entitled ' 'Sand, Sun, Sea and Sex with Strangers, the five S's'.

The researchers point out that the dunes and coastal beaches are examples of open public spaces where these sexual practices are widely carried out, to the point of having been identified and def

'In this sense, there are abundant studies that have addressed the issue of the relationship between tourism and sex (sexual tourism) but few have analysed the consequences of these practices on the natural environment, especially when the spaces where these activities take place are protected areas,' said a spokesman.

The experts located and recorded all the points where sexual encounters (sex spots) happened.

They then collected information related to the dimensions or internal distribution of these spaces, as well as the type of sexual use, their geographical position, the coverage and type of vegetation and the environmental impacts or the lack of management actions.

There were subsequently examined, collated and analysed spatially and statistically using geographic information systems (GIS).

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