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TX - Marine Biologists fear Black Mangroves may not have survived the winter storm in the Coastal Bend

The salt marsh plant plays an important role in the ecosystem and it also helps to prevent the erosion of our coast line.

September 19, 2018

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — Marine Biologists and experts on our local ecology have been looking at the damage done by that arctic blast that hit the state a few weeks ago. One of their biggest fears is that Black Mangroves may have been killed off. The salt marsh plant plays an important role in the ecosystem and it also helps to prevent the erosion of our coast line.

Scientists and researchers are busy out along our salt marshes checking on whether or not Black Mangroves survived our recent arctic storm.

The Black Mangroves is a woody shrub that grows in our salt marshes. It plays an important part in the ecosystem and provides protection from coastal erosion.

"Most were at least top killed and we are in the process of gathering data to determine whether there’s going to be survivors are not," Dr. Ed Proffitt, Texas A&M Corpus Christi Professor of Marine Biology and Ecology said.

Scientists are still looking at whether the benefits of the Black Mangrove outweigh the negatives. That as it was rapidly expanding along our coastline. By the way, it does not provide the preferred environment for the endangered whooping cranes.

See article.

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