West Coast
MILLBRAE, CA – Oct. 8: An egret hunts in the reeds of San Francisco Bay, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, near San Francisco International Airport in a view from Bayfront Park. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

SFO plans to surround airport with 10-mile wall to protect against rising bay waters

$587 million plan aimed at reducing flood risk as climate warms

Concerned that rising waves will flood runways and buildings in the coming years, officials at San Francisco International Airport are moving ahead with a $587 million plan to build a major new sea wall around the entire airport.

The plan, the latest example of the growing cost of climate change in California, involves driving steel pilings — sheets with interlocking edges — into the mud and also constructing concrete walls in some places around all of the airport’s 10-mile perimeter.

“This is something we’ve been looking at for many years,” said Doug Yakel, a spokesman for the airport. “What’s changed is the level of protection that is needed.”

The airport, built in 1927 in a cow pasture at the edge of San Francisco Bay, serves 55 million passengers a year, making it the nation’s seventh busiest. But its runways sit only about 10 feet above sea level.

The runways, terminals and other buildings are protected now by a series of earthen berms and smaller sea walls which the airport built mostly in the 1980s. But they provide only about 3 feet of protection from flooding.

Under the new project, whose fiscal plan was approved by the San Francisco County Board of Supervisors on Sept. 17, the airport will build five more feet of protection.

Read Mercury News article . . .