Northeast
Twitter/@NYPDSpecialOps

NY - Flooding shows risks to city posed by increasing storm deluges

Cars crawling through a foot of water on the Harlem River Drive. Straphangers wading through chest-high pools to get from subway platform to stairway. Water racing down Dyckman Street and pooling along Broadway in Upper Manhattan.

Cars crawling through a foot of water on the Harlem River Drive. Straphangers wading through chest-high pools to get from subway platform to stairway. Water racing down Dyckman Street and pooling along Broadway in Upper Manhattan.

Several inches of rain dropped on parts of New York City Thursday evening, overwhelming the drainage system in those areas, which led to flooding and outflows of sewage into city rivers. Videos on social media chronicled the downpour that left some parts of the city drenched and others entirely untouched.

The cloudburst, as experts call such brief but intense deluges, is one kind of storm that the city can expect to see more of as climate change makes our weather more severe. And while the city has invested billions to update its infrastructure to avoid the resulting flooding, experts say that the city is still not fully prepared for the damage these storms will bring.

“It’s common with these types of storms to have a situation where one neighborhood gets dangerous flooding, while not that far away, no one realizes there's an emergency happening,” said Bernice Rosenzweig, a professor of environmental studies at Sarah Lawrence College and a member of the city’s climate science panel.  

Despite the intensity of flooding shown in videos, the city said that the storm caused no damage.

Read more.