Mid-Atlantic
APNEP and North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs are implementing a project designed to support tribal communities in the Albemarle-Pamlico watershed in considering climate resilience during community planning. Map: Jocelyn Painter/NCSU

NC - Project Promotes Resilience Strategies

The Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership, or APNEP, is partnering with the state Commission of Indian Affairs, or NCCIA, to support tribal communities in the Albemarle-Pamlico watershed in considering climate resilience during community planning.

APNEP, NCCIA and others are working with representatives from tribal organizations in the Albemarle-Pamlico watershed and coastal plain to increase engagement among tribal communities, government agencies and universities, “as well as to acknowledge the unique knowledge and cultural perspectives of these communities surrounding impacts associated with climate change,” according to APNEP.

“We are extremely pleased to have an opportunity to participate in this historic Tribal Resilience Project and to become engaged in a true environmental justice effort designed to improve the quality of life and the environment in American Indian Communities,” said NCCIA Director Greg Richardson in a statement. “We are also excited to have an opportunity to work in partnership with the NC Department of Environmental Quality, NC State University, and a wealth of other agencies who are connected to this project.”

The proposal focuses on the overarching goal to protect the environmental health of the waterways and natural resources in the Albemarle-Pamlico region, as well as the communities that live in, visit and depend upon them, officials said.

“The Albemarle-Pamlico region includes the ancestral territories of Native nations, including Tribal communities who still live in and around the coastal plain today,” said Ryan Emanuel, an associate professor and faculty scholar in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at N.C. State’s College of Natural Resources.  “The cultures and histories of these communities are integrally tied to the region’s landscapes and waterways. Native voices and perspectives are absolutely essential to understanding and planning for climate change.”

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