Northeast
An aquaculture company that wanted to raise Atlantic salmon in Frenchman Bay has had its application rejected by the state of Maine. This graphic depicts the approximate location of where the pens were to be installed.

ME - State Of Maine Rebuffs Aquaculture Operation In Frenchman Bay Across From Acadia

A proposal to raise Atlantic salmon in two 60-acre pens in Frenchman Bay off of Acadia National Park in Maine has been blocked by the state, where the Department of Marine Resources said the company behind the project failed to properly source its fish eggs.

In response to the Department of Marine Resources' decision, the Maine Department of Environmental Protection returned American Aquafarms’ application for a waste discharge license.

According to the Marine Resources department, the salmon pens were proposed to be located on "a 60.37 acre site located northwest of Long Porcupine Island in Frenchman Bay, and on a 60.32 acre site located north of Bald Rock in Frenchman Bay. Both proposals are located in the Town of Gouldsboro."

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Rea also

North Island First Nations disappointed with DFO's handling of 10-year-old fish virus study – Campbell River Mirror / Campbell River Mirror / April 22, 2022

DMR opposes Gouldsboro’s aquaculture licensing ordinance, The Ellsworth American / April 22, 2022

American Aquafarms expected to take a 'pause' to figure out future of salmon farm, Bangor Daily News / April 21, 2022

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While the company, American Aquafarms, can still submit a new application, that would likely add extra years to the permitting process, according to Friends of Acadia.

“The decision by the Maine Department of Marine Resources to terminate the permit for American Aquafarms’ massive salmon farm in Frenchman Bay, was a small victory and we are delighted by the news,” said Stephanie Clement, interim president and conservation director at Friends of Acadia. “This is a serious setback for American Aquafarms, but it is likely not the end of the proposal. There is still a lot of work to do.”

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