Mid-Atlantic
Bay Journal, Oyster cages placed in shallow water in the Lynnhaven River could be seen at low

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As Chris Ludford sees it, the oysters he’s growing in Virginia Beach’s Lynnhaven River are helping to restore the Chesapeake Bay tributary, once fabled for having some of the tastiest bivalves anywhere.

Those oyster cages placed in shallow water in the Lynnhaven River could be seen at low tide. Sign warns boaters of their presence when submerged at other times. (Dave Harp)

“Nobody thought we’d be eating Lynnhaven oysters again,” said Ludford, a part-time oyster farmer and full-time firefighter whose Pleasure House brand of bivalves are featured on the half-shell at several local restaurants.

The Lynnhaven, which extends like an osprey’s claw from the mouth of the Chesapeake into Virginia’s largest municipality, was closed to shellfishing off and on for decades because of pollution. Now, roughly half of the river system has been reopened.

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