Hawaii & Alaska
NELHA / The Fish Site

HI- Why Big Island is set for a massive aquaculture year

Hawaii’s Big Island is due to reinforce its reputation as the epicentre of US aquaculture research, following the award of a $1.8 million grant and the announcement of a brand new aquaculture innovation studio.

Hawaii’s Big Island is due to reinforce its reputation as the epicentre of US aquaculture research, following the award of a $1.8 million grant and the announcement of a brand new aquaculture innovation studio.

Last week US Secretary of Commerce, Gina Raimondo, announced that the Department’s Economic Development Administration (EDA) would award a $1.8 million grant to the Natural Energy Lab of Hawaii (NELHA), to support business retention and growth initiatives at a sustainable technology park. The EDA grant, to be matched with $459,658 in local investment, is expected to create 250 jobs and spur $40 million in private investment.

“The eruption of the Kilauea Volcano had a devastating impact on Hawaii’s economy,” said Raimondo. “This project will support the Big Island’s recovery through the creation of well-paying, quality jobs and the establishment of green technology industries.”

“EDA is committed to helping communities across Hawaii build back stronger following natural disasters,” said Dennis Alvord, Acting Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development. “This EDA investment will allow the NELHA-administered Hawaii Ocean Sciences and Technology Park to extend its Aquaculture Accelerator program and develop an associated aquaculture incubator program, helping attract new businesses and industries.”

Applications invited for aquaculture innovation studio

The news comes shortly after Hatch announced that it would be running an Aquaculture Innovation Studio at NELHA from 1 – 30 July, for startups based in Oceania and the Americas. Available both in-person and remotely, applications are open until 4 June.

Hatch has offices at NELHA and has previously run successful accelerator programmes there. Cohort companies including Symbrosia are now based on Big Island.


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