Mid-Atlantic
Crews working for Weeks Marine, Inc. completed a $21-million dollar project to pump sand on the beach front in Carolina Beach and Kure Beach 2019. (Photo from file).

Funding Available For Study To Extend Beach Nourishment

CAROLINA BEACH - Good news for the Town of Carolina Beach, federal funding for beach nourishment could be extended for another 50 years due to funding made available for a study of extending the project.

Intermin Town Manager Ed Parvin explained, "Staff found out this afternoon, and this is great news that there is Federal money allocated for a potential 50-year project for Carolina Beach. Right now this is 100% Federal funding. Righ now, what we've been pushing for is a 15-year project is all we thought we would get. that is still in the works" and being reviewed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Parvin explained, "Great news that that is funded and moving forward. We will see something back in the next sixty days for that signed agreement for the Army Corps to move ahead with that study. It's a three year study is what it will take to put that in place and hopefully the end outcome is we will get that 50-year approval."
Councilman Steve Shuttleworth said, "That was really good news" and, "We can have a beach for 50 more years."

In July of 2019, he Town asked citizens to submit a letter of support to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for continued federal beach nourishment  through 2036.

The USACE Wilmington District recently published a "Draft Integrated Beach Renourishment Evaluation Report and Environmental Assessment (BRER/EA) for Carolina Beach, - June 2019."

According to Town officials, highlights of the report and Recommended Plan:
• Failure to re-nourish will result in severe beach and dune erosion, destruction of property, wildlife habitat, loss of beach recreation area and result in large negative impacts to our tourist based economy.
• The Recommended Plan will reduce coastal storm damage to homes, businesses and critical infrastructure, mitigate future land loss, maintain recreational value and demand of the beach, and possibly reduce emergency response time.
• The Plan would benefit habitat for sea turtles, shore birds and other wildlife.
• The Plan will benefit our local economy by maintaining the area as a year round tourist destination and support related businesses and jobs.

According the USACE, "The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Wilmington District, North Carolina, has prepared and is seeking public comments on the Draft Integrated Beach Renourishment Evaluation Report and Environmental Assessment (report/EA) study for Carolina Beach, New Hanover County, North Carolina, June 2019.  The purpose of this study is to determine Federal interest to continue coastal storm risk management through periodic nourishment in the Carolina Beach project shoreline from just north of the Carolina Beach Fishing Pier to a point just south of Carolina Sands Drive.  Under the current project authorization, Federal participation in periodic nourishment is scheduled to end in 2020.  If the recommendations in this report are ultimately federally authorized, Federal participation in periodic nourishment would continue from 2022 through 2036.  This study was authorized in the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 under Section 1037(a) --- Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction, with amendments in WRDA of 2018 under Section 1158."

Written comments may be submitted to Eric Gasch, U.S. Army Engineer District, Wilmington, CESAW-ECP-PE, 69 Darlington Avenue, Wilmington, North Carolina 28403. The Wilmington District would appreciate receiving comments no later than 30 days from the date of the notice (July 22, 2019). Comments or questions can also be emailed to Gasch at Eric.K.Gasch@usace.army.mil

To view the draft report visit https://www.saw.usace.army.mil/Missions/Coastal-Storm-Risk-Management/Carolina-Beach/

A project began earlier this year to pump sand on the beach front in Carolina Beach and Kure Beach. Crews working for Weeks Marine, Incorporated completed the $21-million project by April 29th.

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