Southeast
Jacksonville, FL planning map of Downtown, San Marco and Riverside where the purple delineates areas that are more at risk of flooding due to sea-level rise, storm surge and coastal overflow.

FL - With new City resiliency committee, Carlucci aims to mitigate flooding

It’s no secret Jacksonville is a city that is dangerously flood prone. In many areas of the historic districts, summer showers cause nuisance flooding. Even a weak hurricane can cause potentially catastrophic damage.

With new City resiliency committee, Carlucci aims to mitigate flooding
A Lakeshore homeowner looks over flood damage after Hurricane Irma’s waters had receded

It’s no secret Jacksonville is a city that is dangerously flood prone. In many areas of the historic districts, summer showers cause nuisance flooding. Even a weak hurricane can cause potentially catastrophic damage.

In 2013, a Duval County report showed a 20-foot storm surge along the St. Johns River could be caused by a Category 3 hurricane. Even a Category 1 tempest could force six feet of water into downtown. Yet, in 2015, more than half of all active projects aimed to help Duval County survive such storms were unfunded, according to information obtained by The Resident.

At-Large Group 4 Councilman Matt Carlucci wants to change all that.

In November, City Council President Scott Wilson named Carlucci chair of the Council’s a Special Committee on Resilience to address the city’s ability to swiftly recover after being struck by severe weather and flooding. Joining Carlucci on the committee will be Council members Michael Boylan, Aaron Bowman, Randy DeFoor, Garrett Dennis, Joyce Morgan and Wilson. Advising the committee will be City officials, members of the nonprofit and business communities, all of which will be asked to help to develop a resiliency strategy for the county.

“If we get hit by a Category 3 hurricane, the people of Jacksonville are going to be stunned,” said Carlucci. “We need to be ready to handle that.”

Read more.