Gulf of Mexico
Archinect News

FL - Miami’s $4 billion plan to combat sea level rise has radical urban ideas

The City of Miami has published a draft of its Stormwater Master Plan; a $3.8 billion plan to be enacted over the next 40 years, seeking to mitigate the impact of rising sea levels on the city.

The City of Miami has published a draft of its Stormwater Master Plan; a $3.8 billion plan to be enacted over the next 40 years, seeking to mitigate the impact of rising sea levels on the city. The plan sets out a wide portfolio of measures, from stormwater pumps and sea walls to more novel approaches such as floating neighborhoods and streets converted into canals.

The report sets out both short and long-term strategies for the city’s defense from rising sea levels. Near-term resiliency measures, with a 20-to-50-year planning horizon, include both structural and non-structural actions, encompassing everything from infrastructure construction to reformed insurance models. The plan proposes an upgrade to building code strategies, including minimum structure finish-floor levels informed by predicted water surface levels, and a requirement for piled or stilted structures, both buildings and roadways, to consider future sea level rise.

Along with stricter standards on new infrastructure, the plan calls for the raising of existing critical infrastructure to appropriate resiliency heights. This would be achieved though building new containment walls and stairs at entrances, adding new stories, and relocating from ground floor levels. City public works infrastructure would be heightened by adding new concrete pads and slabs, watertight hatches, and raising electrical equipment. The plan also states it may be appropriate to consider the purchase, removal, and relocation of vulnerable structures of infrastructure.

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