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FL - Long awaited beach project now on fast track

As part of the beach nourishment project, Engineering consultant Tom Pierro said Hillsboro Beach will get 70,000 cubic yards of new sand on its north two miles of beach. Deerfield Beach needs 30,000 cubic yards to shore up its south beach and Boca will place 200,000 cubic yards on its southern shore.

Hillsboro Beach – Sand pumped from the Boca Raton Inlet ebb shoal will be enough to nourish this town’s eroding north beach, commissioners learned this week. That’s good news. Dredged sand is half the cost of sand hauls, the material brought to the site by truck, Town Manager Mac Serda told them.

And now, a project years in the process, is likely to be visible by spring. Engineering consultant Tom Pierro said the town will get 70,000 cubic yards of new sand on its north two miles of beach. Deerfield Beach needs 30,000 cubic yards to shore up its south beach and Boca will place 200,000 cubic yards on its southern shore.

The sand will be delivered to its destinations through a pipeline from the dredge site at the inlet. “This is 10 years of work now coming together. Amazing,” Serda said.

Boca Raton awarded the dredge contract this week at a cost of $4 million for mobilization. The Inlet channel will be dredged to 10 to 15 feet, Pierro said.

Still being determined is the actual dollars FEMA and the state will contribute to the revetment, but FEMA contributes 75 percent, the state 12.5 percent and the town the remainder.

Those numbers are expected to be firmed up for a special town meeting on Jan. 24. In Deerfield Beach items relating to the shared nourishment will also be on the commission agenda the same day.

Deerfield Beach City Manager David Santucci was also elated to be able to report to his commission that the dredge and pipeline would deliver the sand rather than hundreds of trucks coming daily to the beaches. The dredging is also a much faster process. Deerfield should see new sand by the end of March, he said.

He estimated the revetment cost to Deerfield Beach at $1.2 million substantially below the $2.5 million budgeted using American Relief Plan funds. There are also substantial reimbursements from state and federal sources, Santucci said.

Time is of the essence, however. The project must be completed before “turtle season.” In Hillsboro, city officials are marking that as April 30.

This week the town and Deerfield Beach agreed to split the $187,000 fee to hire Pierro’s company, Coastal Protection Engineering, to design, permit and oversee construction of the revetment.

To assure the funding appropriations for the nourishment, Hillsboro hired Capital City Lobby group, a company with grant experience at the state and federal level. The cost is $5,000 a month for work with a short timeline.

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