Gulf of Mexico
Beach erosion was evident in late March near the Naples Pier. (Photo: H. Leo Kim/Naples Daily News USA TODAY NETWORK - FLORIDA)

Collier County Florida wants to protect homes near the coast for $30 million

Natural disasters can cause erosion and destruction, that's why Collier County is taking steps to prevent catastrophic damages to structures near the coast.

Natural disasters can cause erosion and destruction, that's why Collier County is taking steps to prevent catastrophic damages to structures near the coast.

Gary McAlpin, The Manager for Collier County's Coastal Zone Management, wants to take steps to prevent catastrophic damages to homes near the coast.

"We're going to look and see if we can design it to resist a 100 year storm,"  McAlpin said.

They are taking a look at four beaches: Vanderbilt, Park Shore, Naples beach, and Marco Island Beach.

Before Walt Harber bought his house, he saw pictures of it after a huge storm.

"Windows [blew] out, and when we re-did it, we got the shells out of the walls in the house," Harber said.

The added features surrounding his house protects it from potential future damages.

"When the water comes up [the seawall] takes the water around the house," Harber said.

The US Army Corps of Engineers will cover 65 percent of the nearly $30 million cost. The remaining money will come from tourists development revenue.

"The prettier it is, the more people they get here, the more taxes they get to do things like this," Harber said.

When the county first visited the idea, they were looking at making the beaches 50 feet wider and about 2 to 3 feet taller, but now they are reconsidering just how wide and tall they need to make it.

"We'll look to resist or to build the beach as wide as we can based on environmental conditions," McAlpin said.

Homeowners said they have no plans on moving out of Southwest Florida.

Read NBC-2 article with video . . .

Read also Collier County explores making its beaches wider, taller . . . .