International
Tidal turbines harness marine currents and tidal energy using tidal stream turbines that work much like submerged windmills, but are driven by flowing water rather than by air. via Marine Current Turbines

CAN - Government of Canada Invests in Tidal Power

The Government of Canada is committed to building a clean energy future to strengthen the economy, create good jobs and support the natural resource sectors. This commitment will be more important than ever as the economy is reopened and plans are made for recovery from the COVID-19 crisis.

The Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, on behalf of the Honourable Seamus O’Regan, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources, accompanied by Lenore Zann, Member of Parliament for Cumberland – Colchester, announced a CAN$9.4 million investment in four tidal energy projects that will bring clean energy technologies to the Atlantic region and help Canada build a cleaner future.

Tidal energy is a renewable energy generated by ocean tides and currents. It has the potential to significantly reduce Canada’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and improve local air quality by displacing electricity generated from fossil fuels.

The announcement took place following a tour of the Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy’s facilities in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia. The investments are:

  • CAN$4 million to Nova Innovation to build a tidal turbine array using subsea tidal technology in Petit Passage in the Bay of Fundy.
  • CAN$1.58 million to the University of Manitoba, in partnership with SOAR – Sustainable Oceans Applied Research, to advance research on river hydrokinetic and in-stream tidal energy technologies in the Canadian context.
  • CAN$2 million to Offshore Energy Research Association of Nova Scotia to research an environmental effects monitoring solution for the instream tidal energy industry in Canada, including fish and marine mammal interactions with tidal devices.
  • CAN$2 million to Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy to outline a plan to assess the encounter risk for fish with tidal devices and create a tool to support the regulatory authorisation process for tidal energy projects. The tidal energy risk assessment programme involves participation from multiple partners, including Acadia University, Marine Renewables Canada, Mi’kmaw Conservation Group, Ocean Tracking Network at Dalhousie University and Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy.

The first project was funded through Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan) Energy Innovation Programme, which provides support to projects reducing emissions, including GHGs, through research, development and demonstration of clean energy technologies, with the aim of meeting 2050 clean growth targets.

Read more.